Bungalowfest Highlights Residents’ Hard Work

Nathan and Madeline Gulliver pose in the living room of their 1925 Craftsman Bungalow at 2027 Burlington Ave. N. as members of the public explore the rest of the house during Historic Kenwood’s 19th annual Bungalowfest on Saturday, November 4. Since buying the home in 2005, the couple has carried out extensive renovations, doing most of the work themselves. Nathan said the neighborhood was already on the upswing when they arrived, “but I never could have imagined how far it’s come now.” Kenwood, which was listed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 2003, was the first neighborhood in St. Petersburg built for year-round working-class residents. Most of its homes are between 1,000 and 1,500 square feet. The Gulliver’s home was one of 10 open to the public for the festival.

A bench with a shark’s mouth was one of seven painted by local artists last month in Historic Kenwood’s Seminole Park. The benches were the first project completed through the Historic Kenwood Public Art Project, which has developed a master plan for creative works to be implemented throughout the neighborhood. The benches were officially unveiled in time for Kenwood’s 19th annual Bungalowfest on Saturday, November 4.

A volunteer chats with some visitors enjoying the front porch of a 1926 Craftsman Bungalow at 2143 3rd Ave. N. that was among 10 open to the public during Historic Kenwood’s 19th annual Bungalowfest on Saturday, November 4. The porch features the original Cuban tile and porch columns made of coquina brick.

 

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