Town Shores Docks to Be Saved

The boat docks at Town Shores will be saved and undergo a rebuild process according to Ray Luce, chairperson of the new dock committee. Immediately following an August 2 Master Association meeting, both the North and South docks were fenced off and open only to boat owners as the result of one study conducted in March 2016 that detailed structural conditions that were described as “problem areas.” The fate of the docks remained in question until a closed association meeting August 16 when the decision was made to rebuild, according to Luce. Boat owners using the docks now have until October 1, 2016 to move their vessels so the rebuilding process can begin.

Ray Luce, left, chairperson of the dock committee and Tom D’angelo, the volunteer dock master, discuss project details on August 22, such as the complete replacement of smaller finger piers that now border each slip. D’angelo, an experienced boat captain, was appointed to his post by Master Association President Jean Proach. Luce said boat owners using the docks now have until October 1, 2016 to move their vessels so the rebuilding process can begin. It will take from two to three months to get boats moved, conduct an engineering survey and complete the permitting process, said D’angelo. Once started, the rebuilding work will take from three to six weeks to finish depending on the weather and contractor availability.

Ray Luce, left, chairperson of the dock committee and Tom D’angelo, the volunteer dock master, discuss project details on August 22, such as the complete replacement of smaller finger piers that now border each slip. D’angelo, an experienced boat captain, was appointed to his post by Master Association President Jean Proach. Luce said boat owners using the docks now have until October 1, 2016 to move their vessels so the rebuilding process can begin. It will take from two to three months to get boats moved, conduct an engineering survey and complete the permitting process, said D’angelo. Once started, the rebuilding work will take from three to six weeks to finish depending on the weather and contractor availability.

 

Diver Kyle Schmidt of Dive-Tech International (DTI) in Pinellas Park inspects a piling above and below the water level at the South Dock in Town Shores on August 22. He’s wearing a special brass helmet equipped with an external waterproof camera in a round, oblong casing that sends a live video feed back to a land-based vehicle where an engineer communicates with him through a real-time audio link. DTI is only doing the inspection and will not be contracted to do rebuilding work on the docks project.

Diver Kyle Schmidt of Dive-Tech International (DTI) in Pinellas Park inspects a piling above and below the water level at the South Dock in Town Shores on August 22. He’s wearing a special brass helmet equipped with an external waterproof camera in a round, oblong casing that sends a live video feed back to a land-based vehicle where an engineer communicates with him through a real-time audio link. DTI is only doing the inspection and will not be contracted to do rebuilding work on the docks project.

 

Ray Luce, chairperson of the new dock committee at Town Shores, points out where new dock pilings will be located on either side of the open water end of new finger piers that will border boat slips. He’s pictured standing on an old finger pier. The new pilings will add needed stability and provide the proper tie-up opportunities for boaters. Cleats, also used for proper boat tie-ups, will be relocated to the new pilings for added stability. Cleats are currently bolted to dock stringer boards, he said. Many are loose. One is pictured next to his right foot.

Ray Luce, chairperson of the new dock committee at Town Shores, points out where new dock pilings will be located on either side of the open water end of new finger piers that will border boat slips. He’s pictured standing on an old finger pier. The new pilings will add needed stability and provide the proper tie-up opportunities for boaters. Cleats, also used for proper boat tie-ups, will be relocated to the new pilings for added stability. Cleats are currently bolted to dock stringer boards, he said. Many are loose. One is pictured next to his right foot.

 

Camdon Hay, left, of Dive-Tech International and Reuben Clarson, a licensed marine engineering consultant, monitor live video being filmed by an underwater diver during the August 22 independent inspection process conducted at the Town Shores boat docks. The two communicate with the diver through a real-time audio link to determine rebuilding specifics including whether pilings can stay or need to be replaced. Town Shores is an over 55 waterfront community. Fees from slip rentals fund dock maintenance and rebuilding, said Ray Luce, chairperson of the dock committee. After the rebuilding process, current monthly dock fees will double, said Tom D’angelo, volunteer dock master. Immediately following the August 2 Master Association meeting, both docks were fenced off and open only to boat owners as the result of one study conducted in March 2016 that detailed structural conditions that were described as “problem areas.”

Camdon Hay, left, of Dive-Tech International and Reuben Clarson, a licensed marine engineering consultant, monitor live video being filmed by an underwater diver during the August 22 independent inspection process conducted at the Town Shores boat docks. The two communicate with the diver through a real-time audio link to determine rebuilding specifics including whether pilings can stay or need to be replaced. Town Shores is an over 55 waterfront community. Fees from slip rentals fund dock maintenance and rebuilding, said Ray Luce, chairperson of the dock committee. After the rebuilding process, current monthly dock fees will double, said Tom D’angelo, volunteer dock master. Immediately following the August 2 Master Association meeting, both docks were fenced off and open only to boat owners as the result of one study conducted in March 2016 that detailed structural conditions that were described as “problem areas.”

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